Category Archives: Photo Journal

Summer Vacation 2018

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It has been a while since I had a teacher’s version of “summer vacation,” that extended period between June and August when I am not in school. For the previous five years, I taught at Remington College in Columbia. We worked in four-week modules, and since I was part time, I worked a mod and then had the next mod off. Now that I am working full-time in secondary education again at Newberry Academy, I now teach for thirty-six weeks and now I’m off for about 10—all of June and July and two weeks in August. Oh, perhaps I should say I also have most of this last week of May off as well, even though I’m going back to school tomorrow for a yearbook mini-camp.

So, how will I spend my summer?

First, I’m going to catch up on my fun reading! I don’t have a reading list yet per se, but I have several books on my Kindle that I want to read.

Second, I’m going to work on my photography. I have subscribed off and on to Lenswork Magazine, a print and online magazine that focuses on the photograph itself, not the gear or even the techniques. For the last couple of years, the publishers have had a juried “contest” in which photographers submit a story in six photographs. I don’t think I can enter that contest this year, but I think it might give me a focus for my summer work. Can I make images that capture the story in six images in such a way that each image can also stand alone and tell that story? In preparation, I’m charging up the batteries now, and soon I’ll clear the memory card!

I’m also planning to work on editing techniques. I joined the Shift Art website (pricey!), but I think it will be worth it. There are tutorials and articles and other goodies to inspire me.

This morning, I worked on learning some editing techniques using Auto Tone and Auto Color in Photoshop. I used an image I took a couple of weeks ago. I don’t know the name of this flower, but it’s pretty, and it’s interesting. I wanted to make sure the flower was dominant, so I practiced, and edited, and started over. This is the image I came up with. I used Auto Tone and Auto Color. Then I applied two layers of patterns and textures. Finally, I added a light vignette. I’ll put the original and edited image side by side to show the two versions.

 

The first image is the original, unedited image. It’s too dark. My edit, the second one, lightens the image and brings out the flower. I like the kind of hazy background, which is further emphasized a bit by the pattern and the texture. At the end of the process, I added a vignette using a curves adjustment layer, dragging the curve down toward the bottom right corner, and then using a black brush to uncover the portions of the image I wanted to reveal. I lowered the opacity of this vignette layer as well because I did not want it too dark on the edges. I still wanted the brightness and haziness of the background to come through.

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(I think I may have desaturated the background slightly as well so that the color of the flower can stand out.)

I enjoy floral photography, and I enjoy applying textures. I want to stretch myself as a photographic artist.

Spring Break

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What do you do when you go out for a photo walk only to discover that the camera batteries are dead? I had just enough “juice” to change the white balance and the shooting mode. The last time I used the camera was to shoot a school pageant in the gym, so I had the shooting mode set to continuous and the white balance to auto because gym lighting is notoriously bad and hard to get right, at least for me.

Well, I just turned myself around, put the camera back in the car, and started walking again, pretending I did have the camera. I looked for things I would shoot if I had the camera. I paid attention to the light and shadow patterns of trees, tree limbs, and leaves on the pavement. I noticed the color of the leaves, and the contrasting greens against each other. I watched the ospreys soar in spirals overhead, their bodies black against blue skies. I noticed the fallen blooms from the trumpet vines. I walked with my eyes open (at least until my legs began to give out. I actually pushed myself a little bit too far after having a medical procedure yesterday).

Sometimes, walking without a camera makes it easier to see things. I can go back tomorrow or the next day or the day after that. Yes, I know the lighting will not be exactly the same as it was today, but there will be something new to notice.

I think that’s what I like about photography. It teaches me to see things I might not notice otherwise.

I did manage to get some pictures of the sunrise at church Sunday morning before the Easter sunrise service began. After the service I went out to the prayer garden to take a few pictures of the trees that were blooming. The cherry was in full bloom with some red leaves beginning to show. The palm was also blooming, at least I think that’s what it’s doing. It’s a funny looking bloom, though! Oh well! It is spring here in the South. Tomorrow, IMG_4285IMG_4290IMG_4292IMG_4293I

will try again. I may even go hiking in a state park in the mountains with at least one of my sons, who is also out of school on spring break.

I Miss My Camera

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But it hasn’t gone anywhere. It’s sitting right there on the piano bench (where else would a camera sit, right?).

I just haven’t picked it up in a couple of weeks.

I have been “too busy.”

You see, I started a new job this week. I left my comfortable position at Remington College, teaching one or two classes a day, four days a week, four weeks at a time with four or five weeks off between mods, to teach full time for a small private school closer home. Instead of leaving home at 8:00 in the morning, I’m leaving an hour earlier. Instead of leaving work by 2:15 or so, I’m leaving well after 3:30, sometimes closer to 5:00. Instead of teaching adult learners, I’m teaching 11, 12, 14, 15, 16, and 17 year olds! Yeah, everything from middle-school English to senior English, with World History and Desktop Publishing/Yearbook, thrown in just to keep my life interesting. And it is interesting.

But still, I miss my camera. I miss having the freedom to pick it up regardless of the time of day to play.

I miss being able to ramble whenever I feel like it.

I miss the creative element of being a photographer and an “artist.”

Perhaps, when I get used to my new schedule, I’ll figure out how to work in the photography.

But for now, I will study. I will develop a new rhythm. I will simply miss the camera.

Procrastination: Putting off today what you can do tomorrow

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Or can you?

Yesterday, I walked around the ponds, headphones on, water bottle slung over one shoulder, step tracker clipped on my shirt. I was out for exercise.

That did not stop my roaming eye. As I walked up the powerline right of way, I saw another purple flower—a Maypop blossom! (Some people may call them passion flowers.) These vines grow wild in these parts. After they bloom, they bear fruit. I’ve heard you can eat the fruit, but I never did. When I was a child, I played with Maypops, using sticks to make animals out of them.

When I saw the flower, I was excited! But I was midway through my second lap, and I did not want to interrupt the momentum of the walk. I did not go back for the camera.

I lost the opportunity to take the photo of the purple passion flower//Maypop blossom. Surely, it will be in bloom tomorrow. . . . .

Well, here is what is looks like today.

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It is beginning to close.  It’s a strange-looking thing at this stage.  The good news is, that while I was taking this photo, I saw that there are a few more buds that haven’t opened yet. I will be watching these so that I can get the picture.  And I will be watching for the fruit, too. I may even make a Maypop animal!

Here are some other things I saw along the walk around the pond today.

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Roses in the backyard

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Wild blackberries beginning to ripen

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An interesting bent tree

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The grand oaks that line one side of the dam between “Herbert’s” pond and Gramps’s pond.

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Mushrooms, moss, and fallen leaves—an interesting combination of textures. (No, I did not stage this.)

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Red trumpet vines.

All I have to do is keep my eyes open.

By the way, I’m not exactly upset with myself that I didn’t go back and take a picture yesterday. I carry the memory.

History—Past and Present and What It Might Say about Our Future

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I haven’t been “philosophical” on my blog in a long, long time. But I have some thoughts today.

I spent the weekend in Bennetts Point with Mama and my brother and sister. We went expressly for the program sponsored by the community association about the new historical marker put up at the boat landing at the Frank Baldwin Bridge. The marker honors the Engagement at Chapman’s Fort when five Union soldiers received the Medal of Honor for rescuing hundreds of soldiers when their vessel, the Boston,  sank. I won’t go into the whole history, but here is the gist:

In May 1863, the Union vessel, The Boston, sailed up the Ashepoo River to take out the trestle for the Charleston-Savannah Railroad in order to cripple the Southern troops and the South in general. Southern troops managed to keep the Boston from reaching the bridge. While on the trip, the Boston became lodged on in the marsh. At one point, an order was given to destroy the vessel. Five Union soldiers helped rescue hundreds of black Union soldiers. The rescuers were white.

Now, that may not be a big deal, but this monument is a BIG DEAL. First, it recognizes a Civil War battle that took place in the South. Second, it honors an engagement in which the Confederate forces were (sort of, thanks to the grounding the Union vessel) successful in preventing the Union forces from destroying a vital portion of the railroad. Third, the marker honors five UNION soldiers who received the Medal of Honor for their acts of bravery. These men did not care about the color of the skin of the men in the regiment. Those men needed saving. Period.

 

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I’m processing all this in the context of recent events in New Orleans where Confederate monuments have been removed. We cannot change history. The Civil War, the War between the States, or the War of Northern Aggression—however you want to name it—happened. That fact can’t be changed by anyone. There were brave men on both sides of the line; there were Southerners who were opposed to slavery but fought to protect their land. There were unscrupulous men who fought only to kill another human being. There were cowards on both sides as well. We can’t rewrite history or change the facts.

What we can do, though, is try to understand what happened. We have to learn what really happened. We have to see things through the other side’s eyes, whoever that other side is.

What I appreciate about this marker is that it honors Medal of Honor winners. It presents a more balanced view of this engagement. The Bennetts Point community should be proud of it.untitled-26

Picture Spring

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What does spring look like in your part of the Northern Hemisphere? I have to be careful because I have friends in various social media groups who live in the Southern Hemisphere, and it’s winter there.

Today is a kind of stormy looking day. I do hear a bit of thunder now and again, but so far, the day is just cloudy. The jasmine has bloomed, as have the blackberries. I see the honeysuckle, though. My roses are blooming as well. The trumpet vine is not as colorful as it was two weeks ago. Everything is green.

It sounds kind of funny to start a Picture Spring project in May, but that’s going to be my focus this month in my personal photography. I want to look more closely at what spring looks like here in my corner of the world.

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I will be doing some of my own prompts while I take on this project, but I will also be following Tracey Clark’s Picture Spring class. I have taken Tracey’s classes before when she taught through Big Picture Classes, and she is inspiring. I am looking forward to starting on May 15.

It has been hard to get out to photography this past month. It has been incredibly busy as we had Aaron’s wedding on April 1. I still have to go through the CDs of pictures they sent me and choose the ones I want to use in an album so I can show my beautiful daughter and handsome son. Then, no sooner than I get home from the wedding, I get sick with bronchitis and sinusitis. I am still coughing, and having some issues, so getting out with the camera to walk has not been easy.

Hopefully, May will be better. I will go out and start to photograph spring. And, of course, I will mess around with Photoshop and Topaz and the various textures and overlays that I’ve accumulated. It will be a time to create more art.

I will also be putting together a new course on Teachable.com that combines writing and photography. Look for more information about it in the coming weeks.

While I Was Not Looking

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THIS happened:

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Things started blooming.

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I have “prided” myself on being observant, of seeing the world, but somehow, all of this happened, and I didn’t notice.

I’ll blame it on

getting ready for Aaron and Sherry’s beautiful wedding on April 1.

going back to work and writing lesson plans and grading papers on March 20.

being “busy.”

getting ready for Easter.

coming down with bronchitis and sinusitis.

You get the idea. I have a million and one excused for allowing all this beauty to go unnoticed. Yet, there it is. I noticed it Saturday, the first day I went out of the house for a reason other than necessity. I saw the white bloom of the blackberries, but I didn’t have the camera. I noticed it.

On my way back to the house (coughing, short of breath, thanks to the bronchitis), I saw the yellow and red of the trumpet vines (or whatever they are). I noticed it.

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And the red Knockout roses are in bloom.

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I noticed it.

This morning, I went out with the camera, and I noticed other things—holly berries, wildflowers, dandelions, even some honeysuckle. It’s all there.

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And today, I noticed it.

What did you notice today?